The passive revolutionary contribution to Middle Eastern unrest.

datePosted on 15:25, January 15th, 2015 by Pablo

This week I attended a talk by Kiwi journalist Yasmine Ryan, currently based in Tunis. Yasmine previously worked for al-Jazeera and now freelances from her Tunisian base. Her talk was about the state of affairs in the Arab world, and more specifically, North Africa.

She had many interesting things to say but I garnered three main points from her talk. First, the the so-called Arab Spring has failed to open Arab politics in any meaningful way. Second, levels of corruption in the Arab world are so high and so pervasive that reform is virtually impossible, especially when foreign interests back the entrenched power elites. Third, state capacity (measured by public infrastructural development, enforcement of norms beyond simple repression and provision of goods and services) is woefully lacking throughout the region, something that contributes to pervasive discontent amongst disempowered groups.

Her bottom line was that although Tunisia is touted as an Arab Spring success story, it is in fact not and yet is the best of a sorry lot of post-dictatorial regimes now governing in North Africa.

As Yasmine spoke, I found myself pondering her use of words. She referred to the Tunisian “revolution” and to the “democratisation” of Arab politics. Her use of these terms reflects standard journalistic practice although she knows well that nothing of the sort has happened in North Africa. Let me explain why.

“Revolutions” properly conceived are popular uprisings that lead to the armed overthrow of the state and the imposition of a paradigmatic change on society under a new political regime in the wake of the overthrow. The first key to revolutionary success is victory over the repressive apparatus, either as a result of combat or because the repressive apparatus switches its allegiances to the new sovereign contenders. The second key to revolutionary success is the scope of paradigmatic change covering political society, civil society and the economic structure of the nation-state. Needless to say, none of this happened as a result of the so-called Arab Spring.

So what did happen? Well, if revolution does not eventuate and democracy does not obtain, then other outcomes are possible. The regime being challenged can use its repressive superiority to reassert its authority and crack down on dissent, thereby quashing the seeds of popular uprising. This occurred in Bahrain, although it took Saudi Arabian troops to help repress the mostly Shiia uprising against the Sunni elite in that country. To a lesser extent it occurred in the 2009-10 election protests and the 2011-12 Arab Spring-inspired “Day of Rage” protests in Iran.

Another alternative outcome is a civil war where the challenged regime is forced into an armed struggle with rebel groups or in which the old regime is overthrown but new power contenders fight each other in order to establish their claim to being the new sovereign. The former is happening in Syria and the latter is happening in Libya.  Iraq is a variation on this, with foreign intervention rather than popular unrest being the gateway (if not cause) for post-authoritarian internecine violence marshalled along sectarian lines.

A third option is for the authoritarian regime being challenged to engage in what is known as a “passive revolution.” “Passive revolution” is where the regime elite adopts cosmetic changes and engages in reform-mongering to appease popular discontent but does not fundamentally alter the power elite or the institutional bases of their power.  One of the cosmetic changes is electioneering rather than democratisation (which involves more than elections and encompasses institutional, social and economic life). This, sadly, is what has happened in Tunisia after the fall of Zine El Abidine Ben Ali and in Egypt after the respective ousters of Hosni Mubarak and Mohamed Morsi. In both cases the power elite underpinning the ousted authoritarian leaders regrouped under an electoral facade that allowed them to cloak their rule in a mantle of “democratic” legitimacy. In Egypt’s case the scenario had a twist in that Morsi was allowed to become the first freely elected president in Egyptian history, but when his Muslim Brotherhood government pushed its Islamicist-backed constitutional project and Morsi granted himself unlimited executive powers not subject to judicial or parliamentary review, they were deposed in a military coup. The leader of the coup and then head of the Egyptian military, Abdel Fattah el-Sisi, is now president of Egypt.

However, for a passive revolution to work it must, along with continuing to selectively repress dissent, deliver goods otherwise not obtained by the discontented masses. Be it as a short term or longer term strategy, the passive revolutionary approach is more than political window dressing because it hinges on giving the appearance of progressive change by providing public goods and services, and material benefits, that previously were unavailable. Yet, in Egypt as well as Tunisia, none of that has occurred because of rampant corruption, lack of state capacity, and an absence of economic opportunity under the power elites that ruled before the regime changes and who continue to rule today. What has occurred is the resumption of repression of those who wish to push for a further and more substantive political opening.

This means that the root causes of popular discontent remain unaddressed, which makes the passive revolutionary approach inherently weak. It is akin to putting a sticking plaster on an arterial bleed–it may staunch some short term dissent but it cannot contain the surge of discontent over the long term.

But there is a twist to the story. It turns out that Tunisia has supplied the largest contingent of foreign fighters to the Islamic State. Egypt also has proved to be a fertile recruiting ground for jihadists, and Libya is overrun with them fighting to overthrow the central government in Tripoli. Why would alienated individuals in Tunisia and Egypt opt to join a foreign war rather than continue to fight for progressive political change at home?

I believe the answer is that those who choose to leave to fight for IS or al-Qaeda see the results of the Arab Spring for what they really are: a reassertion of the traditional status quo under different guise. Understanding the impossibility of affecting significant political, social and economic change at home, these disaffected fighters migrate to foreign conflicts in which the enemy is clear (be it the West, Israel, Iran or Shiia Islam in general) and in which their skills in the management of organised violence can be honed for future use at home should they survive combat. Should they not, they will have died for what they believe to be a good cause.

That is the crux of the “returning jihadi” problem. They pose no existential threat to the West or even stable authoritarian regimes (barring an overreaction by the state and society that makes it appear as if there is in fact a “war” between Islam as a whole and the non-Islamic world). They do not pose an existential threat to stable Muslim dominant societies such as Indonesia and Malaysia. But they do pose a potential existential threat to the passive revolutionary regimes in North Africa as well as in failing or failed states such as Yemen, Somalia and/or those in which civil war is occurring (to include Nigeria even if Boko Harum is comprised of indigenous fighters who for the most part have not traveled abroad).

That is why I see al-Qaeda  and the Islamic State as regional rather than global problems–they may have a world wide impact given the decentralised nature of terrorist tactics outside of the Middle East, but their real strategic impact stems from the existential threat they pose to the Middle East itself. After all, even if they use the US, the West, Israel and/or Iran as foils for their violent ambitions, al-Qaeda and IS have their eyes focused squarely on the Gulf petrolarchies as much if not more than they do on any other territorial and political objective.

In the end, it has been the failure of the Arab Spring to deliver on its theoretical promise and popular expectations for real change that has led to the rise of IS and the spreading wave of violent unrest throughout the Arab world. After a moment that promised a thawing of old political structures and the germination of new ideas about the relationship between state and society, the region has proven yet again to be barren ground for peaceful, progressive and lasting social change.

PS: Here is something I wrote in 2011 about Tunisia and other Middle Eastern transitions. Although I do not claim any particular expertise on the Middle East or Arab world, I think that by and large my observations of four years ago have stood the test of time.

4 Responses to “The passive revolutionary contribution to Middle Eastern unrest.”

  1. Dericali on January 16th, 2015 at 21:29

    I don’t follow the jump from the ‘returning Jihadi’ problem of many countries in the MENA region, to saying that ISIS is focused squarely on the Gulf petrolarchies.

    I would say that many of the GCC nations are highly resistant to revolution, at least: UAE, Qatar, Kuwait, since its citizens are highly affluent, its leadership traditions are long-standing with fairly consistent power hand-over methods, while its citizen populations are highly homogenous (also to mention that they are virtual police states) and there is a strong ‘cult of nationhood’ in the region that would make citizens unlikely to turn against their leaders.

    Oman is one exception, with a less clear future pathway for its leadership transition, and with less ethnic homogeneity… Plus contagion in Yemen always able to spill cross-border. But it’s also not particularly rich.

    Bahrain, as a vassel state of KSA is not likely to fail, since any Shiite nationalist movement in the GCC would be intensely dangerous to Saudi Arabia, in part since the Eastern Region in KSA where there is a Shiite majority is oil rich (while government under-spending in the province means that they are generally impoverished and excluded compared with the Sunni majority across the country). Saudi is arguably the most likely significant candidate for revolution in the GCC, due to a large, young and growing population, but the government is taking many steps to pour water on this powder keg, including massive social spending, slow liberalisation of social policies, while bolstering its army/internal security apparatus. Compare this with Egypt, where there are massive economic problems that can boil over into anarchistic revolutionary zeal (GNI per capita in Egypt: $3,140. In Saudi: $26,260).

    So while ISIS may have the Gulf petrolarchies in its view, I can’t imagine it having the naive view it can overthrow the long-standing leaders in the Gulf. The best ISIS could hope to achieve is a few home-grown terror actions, which would probably only further cement the sentiment of citizens in favour of the status quo.

  2. Pablo on January 17th, 2015 at 13:28

    Dericali:

    You might be correct but I believe that you overstate the ability of the GCC states to reform monger over the long term (especially in the face of falling oil process and the rising influence of transnational social media) and under-estimate the impact of returning jihadis to those states (since there are plenty of fighters from GCC states honing their skills–when not dying–with AQ and IS).

    To be sure, the GCC are better positioned than there North African neighbours to appease pre-revolutionary unrest, but that does not mean that all is well in the various kingdoms. Add to that the presence of unhappy Shiia and foreign worker populations in them and you have the potential for broader-based trouble, especially if abetted and exacerbated from abroad.

    As a side note related to the response to the Paris attacks, I found this article by a US security academic to be a refreshing antidote to the reactionary hysteria that has dominated media and governmental discourse on the matter: https://foreignpolicy.com/2015/01/16/think-before-you-march-charlie-hebdo-islamist-terrorism/?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_term=%2AEditors%20Picks&utm_campaign=2014_EditorsPicks1%2F16RS

  3. Marjolin on January 21st, 2015 at 08:06

    “I do not claim any particular expertise on the Middle East or Arab world”

    Hi Pablo, I would really love to get some expert commentary. Could you recommend a commentator or writer who does have this particular expertise?

  4. Pablo on January 21st, 2015 at 09:53

    Marjoin:

    Juan Cole is a good one to start with.

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